Dharma Journal – May 2017

Dharma Journal teachings from Aaron channeled by Barbara Brodsky

Transcription and closed captioned.

The Three Kayas: Part 2

 My blessings and love to you all. I am Aaron. Thank you for this opportunity to speak with you today.

 Last month I spoke about the three kayas and staying connected with the pure heart, but without fear of connecting to the world. Sometimes it’s not fear of connecting but fear of losing that center, but you can never lose this space of divine consciousness within you.

I promised some suggestions on how to come back into that space in those times where the world has gotten to be too much for you; when you’re constantly rushing around doing this, fixing that, and it seems that the need is never-ending. The need is never-ending. Can you really do more if you let go of the essence of being and become another lost soul screaming for help?

Last month I spoke of the sambhogakaya, or wealth body, the bridge between the divine and the outside mundane world. When we think about a bridge, we think of the whole span of the bridge, and it doesn’t matter if you’re here or here or here on the bridge. But it does matter. The closer you are to the Dharmakaya side of the bridge, to the awakened heart, awakened consciousness, the more stable you are as you walk across.

Think of it as walking out of a very well-heated house on a bitter winter day. There’s a long vestibule. You step through the inner door and immediately it’s cooler. But you’re not freezing yet. You walk, and you walk, and you walk, a 100 yard hallway. The outer door is open. You begin to feel the cold. Perhaps there is something you must do right at the end of the hallway. Last month I used the image of the person who had fallen in the river and needed to be rescued. Well, here’s somebody at the end of the hallway shouting for help. You don’t pay too much attention to the cold. You walk down there and you do what is needed for that person. Then you return to the warmth. Are you going to sit there shivering together at the end of the hallway?

Let’s pretend it’s a child who has fallen and skinned his knees. He’s hurt, he’s bleeding, he’s afraid, and he’s shivering. You will want to pick him up and carry him back toward the warmth. Why would you stay at the end of the hallway by the open door where the winds are screeching and the sleet pouring in? Come back to the warmth.

Some of you have the idea that you can only serve in the world if you jump through that further doorway to suffer with those who are out there suffering. Your suffering does not help anybody, it only adds to the suffering in the world. Come home, come home.

The first step is repeatedly to remember: I can come home. I choose to come home. And also, when you start to feel dispersed, fragmented, and lost from that pure heart, know when you’re losing touch with it. Stop. Time to come home. Coming home can be as simple as: breathing in, I am aware of fragmentation, contraction, and fear. Breathing out, I hold loving space for these experiences. I re-enter the heart of love. I choose to re-enter the heart of love.

Maybe you’re in a conversation with someone who has very opposing views to yours, and he is becoming very angry, starting to flail his arms around and contort his face, using crude words; you feel yourself being sucked into his anger. “I choose to stay connected to love.” Only love can heal. Fear cannot heal. “I choose to stay connected to love.” So, intention in this way is a vital part of the training. Remember to keep re-connecting to your intention.

Trust in your ability to come back to the pure heart, is another part of this. However many times you have fallen off the edge of the hallway and into the blizzard, freezing and needing to scream for help; look at those experiences and remember: I have the capacity to return home.

I’d like you to visualize something for me. Maybe we’ll call it a very short meditation. Imagine yourself sitting in what I call the Dharmakaya, the Unconditioned, the Divine or Christ consciousness, and imagine it as a beautiful cavern of magnificent colors and lights. Beautiful melodies are playing. Imagine yourself sitting right in the cave doorway. As the divine breath breathes itself out, we may remember the line from the Bible: In the beginning was the Word, and the divine breath. Ahhh; feel that breath, ahhh, and with that breath, ahhh, the creation of the world. You move out with that breath.

But, my dear ones, what exhales also inhales. Come back home. Come back home. Why would you have need to do otherwise? So, the second part of the mindfulness is to begin to watch for the places where you begin to forget to come home. Is there an “I should”? “There is so much pain, I should stay out there, no matter how distracted I am becoming”. Is there some kind of a martyr complex in you, something that only feels, “I am only doing good if I am in pain.”? That doesn’t make sense to me. You are love, and you are loved. There is no reason for you to suffer, and your suffering does not benefit others. Quite the contrary, your modeling non-suffering is what helps others most.

Ahhh, and then drawing the breath back in, coming back into the divine heart, and knowing yes, I am whole. Practice with it until you can flow out easily and flow back. Flow out and flow back. You can learn how to do this. It’s not too hard.

Learn how it feels to rest in that space just at the doorway of the Dharmakaya, the beginning of that bridge. Feeling radiating light around you; high energy; the heart open with love, joy, and connection. You may have to do this first just silently in your meditation until it becomes a stable resting place. Then as you venture further out into the world, begin to notice that the further you come from that divine heart, the shakier the footing gets. Go only as far as you feel comfortable, and come home. Do it again, another day, and come home. Gradually you will begin to find yourself more comfortable venturing further out.

Yes, there is enormous suffering in the world. But, as with my earlier image, if you jump off the shore into a raging river to save somebody, and your rope lets your swim a hundred yards downstream, it’s likely going to be beyond your capacity to come back.

I am not suggesting that you work from fear but from wisdom that knows your present capacity, and then is able to keep expanding that capacity. Eventually, yes, you’ll be able to simply swim your way back up the 100 yards of river without the rope. But for now, know what is real for you what you are capable of, and give yourself practice at doing it successfully without losing touch with this pure heart, without losing the radiance and love.

I will pause here. We’ll pick this up again next month. There’s much to add to this. Thank you for your attention.